Press release regarding the U.S. reestablishment of a permanent Department of State presence in Greenland

The Government of Greenland welcomes the reestablishment of a permanent Department of State presence in Greenland

The U.S. Embassy in Copenhagen has announced that the U.S. is to reestablish a permanent Department of State presence in Greenland. This decision underlines a growing U.S. focus on the Arctic and an American interest in increased dialogue with Greenland – a development the Government of Greenland bids welcome.

Minister for Foreign Affairs Ane Lone Bagger states:
”Greenland is a part of North America. Not only geographically, but also through our ethnicity, culture and language, which we share with Inuit across Alaska and Arctic Canada.

However, despite our geographical closeness, cooperation and economic exchange between Greenland and the U.S. could be much more evident.

We therefore welcome the decision of the U.S. government to the reestablishment of a permanent Department of State presence in Nuuk - we have a lot to discuss. A presence in Nuuk will help the Americans better understand our country and our society, which is a prerequisite for a good and fruitful cooperation in the future.

We are currently taking steps from our side to restore our physical connection with our North American neighbors. The airport development plans that will allow flights directly between our country and the USA by 2023, together with the shipping routes opening up to Portland, Maine by the end of this year, through the Royal Arctic Line – Eimskip cooperation, is making our country more accessible.

It is our hope and expectation that the permanent Department of State presence in our country will spur new partnerships with our American neighbors. We look forward to cooperating with the permanent Department of State presence on the development of opportunities for investments, trade, education etc. and welcome them back to our country”.


In 2013, Iceland opened its consulate in Nuuk, Greenland. This was a very significant development for us, since Iceland’s Consul-General is the first permanent diplomatic presence posted in Greenland since the end of World War II. The U.S. had a consulate in Nuuk from 1940 to 1953. The building the Americans built for the purpose today houses The Greenland National Board of Health.